10.1 - Basic List Reports

10.1 - Basic List Reports

In this section, we'll learn how to create three different basic list reports. In the first example, we'll create a basic list report of an entire SAS data set. In the second example, we'll create a basic list report of part of a SAS data set by selecting just a subset of the variables contained in the data set. In the last example, we'll create a basic list report of part of a SAS data set by selecting just those observations in the data set that meet a certain condition.

Example 10.2

The following SAS program creates a basic list report of the entire permanent SAS data set called stat480.penngolf:

LIBNAME stat480 'C:\simon\stat480wc\fa08\10report\sasndata\';

PROC REPORT data = stat480.penngolf NOWINDOWS;
   title 'Some Pennsylvania Golf Courses';
RUN;
Some Pennsylvania Golf Courses
ID Name Architect Year Type Par Yards Slope USGA
101 Toftrees Ed Ault 1968 Resort 72 7018 134 74.3
102 Penn State Blue William Park, Jr. 1921 Public 72 6525 128 72.0
103 Centre Hills Alex Findlay 1921 Private 71 6392 128 71.2
104 Lewistown CC   . Private 72 6779 125 72.3
105 State College Elks Lowell Erdman 1973 SemiPri 71 6369 123 70.9
106 Park Hills CC James Harrison 1966 SemiPri 70 6004 126 69.3
107 Sinking Valley CC Ad Ault 1967 SemiPri 72 6755 132 73.4
108 Williamsport CC A.W Tillinghast 1909 Private 71 6489 131 71.9
109 Standing Stone CC Geoffrey Cornish 1973 SemiPri 70 6593 120 71.4
110 Bucknell GC   1960 SemiPri 70 6253 132 70.0
111 Mount Airy Lodge Hal Purdy 1972 Resort 72 7123 140 74.3

The REPORT procedure contained in this code represents the most basic form of the procedure, in which the data set is specified and the NOWINDOWS option is used. Of course, you have to tell SAS the data set whose contents you want displayed. The NOWINDOWS option — also known as the NOWD option — tells SAS to display the report in the output window. If you don't specify the NOWINDOWS option, then SAS uses the WINDOWS option by default, which tells SAS to display the report in a special REPORT window (note, this has changed in the latest version of SAS and NOWINDOWS is now the default).

If you've already followed the directions in Example 10.1, and have thus run the program there, then you can simply launch this program, delete the LIBNAME statement, run the SAS program, and review the output from the REPORT procedure.

If you haven't already followed the directions in Example 10.1, you'll need to download the stat480.penngolf data set by clicking on the link. After you've saved the data set in a convenient location on your computer, launch the SAS program, and edit the LIBNAME statement so that it reflects the location in which you saved the stat480.penngolf data set. Then, run the SAS program, so that you have access to the data set throughout the lesson. Then, review the output from the REPORT procedure.

Upon reviewing the output, you should notice that all eleven of the observations and all nine of the variables contained in the stat480.penngolf data set are printed. As, you can see, by default, the variables appear in the order in which they occur in the data set. Oh, you might also note that the report continues across two pages, because SAS can't fit it in one page as the PRINT procedure can. This has to do with the default width SAS allocates to each column. This is a column attribute that we'll learn how to modify in the next section.

Example 10.3

Rather than telling SAS to display the entire stat480.penngolf data set, the following SAS program uses the COLUMN statement to tell SAS to display just five of the columns — Name, Year, Type, Par and Yards — in the order specified:

PROC REPORT data = stat480.penngolf NOWINDOWS HEADLINE;
     title 'Some Pennsylvania Golf Courses';
     column Name Year Type Par Yards;
RUN;
Some Pennsylvania Golf Courses
Name Year Type Par Yards
Toftrees 1968 Resort 72 7018
Penn State Blue 1921 Public 72 6525
Centre Hills 1921 Private 71 6392
Lewistown CC . Private 72 6779
State College Elks 1973 SemiPri 71 6369
Park Hills CC 1966 SemiPri 70 6004
Sinking Valley CC 1967 SemiPri 72 6755
Williamsport CC 1909 Private 71 6489
Standing Stone CC 1973 SemiPri 70 6593
Bucknell GC 1960 SemiPri 70 6253
Mount Airy Lodge 1972 Resort 72 7123

Launch and run the SAS program, and review the output to convince yourself that just the requested subset of the data set has been displayed in the report. Oh, you might also want to take note of the effect of the HEADLINE option. As you can see, the HEADLINE option tells SAS to underline all of the column headings, as well as the spaces between the columns. It's a nice way to "prettify" your output!

Example 10.4

Again, rather than telling SAS to display the entire stat480.penngolf data set, the following SAS program uses:

  • the COLUMN statement to tell SAS to display just five of the columns — Name, Year, Type, Par and Yards — in the order specified, and
  • the WHERE statement to tell SAS to display only those golf courses whose Type equals Private or Resort.

Here's the program:

PROC REPORT data = stat480.penngolf NOWINDOWS HEADSKIP;
     title 'Some Pennsylvania Golf Courses';
     column Name Year Type Par Yards;
	 where Type in ('Private', 'Resort');
RUN;
Some Pennsylvania Golf Courses
Name Year Type Par Yards
Toftrees 1968 Resort 72 7018
Centre Hills 1921 Private 71 6392
Lewistown CC . Private 72 6779
Williamsport CC 1909 Private 71 6489
Mount Airy Lodge 1972 Resort 72 7123

Launch and run the SAS program, and review the output to convince yourself that just the requested subset of the data set has been displayed in the report. This time, you might want to take note of the effect of the HEADSKIP option. As you can see, the HEADSKIP option tells SAS to write a blank line beneath all of the column headings, as well as the spaces between the columns. If you use the HEADSKIP option in conjunction with the HEADLINE option, SAS writes a blank line beneath the underline. You might want to add the HEADLINE option to this code and re-run it just so you can see the effect for yourself.


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